Being prepared both physically and mentally will help the mother stay in control of the situation during delivery. It is important that the mother feels in control, and that the baby’s birth is as positive an experience as possible. In order to be able to function as effectively as possible during labour and delivery, both parents must be familiar with the three stages of labour, the standard labour and delivery procedures involved, and the recommended breathing and relaxation techniques and pain control options. You also need to spend some time preparing your mind, body, and soul for childbirth.

Here are some suggestions for how to prepare for birth.

Mind

  • Learn about labor
  • Learn about the type of birth you have planned
  • Learn a bit about the other birthing scenarios out there
  • Talk to your doctor about pain management options
  • Ask questions
  • Make a birth plan
  • Expect and accept unexpected

Body

  • Exercise during pregnancy
  • Take pregnancy preparation classes
  • Have your bag packed
  • Choose the place where to give birth and preregister

Soul

  • Take a hospital tour
  • Be comfortable with your healthcare providers
  • Have a partner in the delivery room
  • Remember it’s only the beginning

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For parents, there are so many exciting things to do in preparation for your little one. Finding cute clothes, decorating the nursery, and having a baby shower are all fun and help to build a bond between you, your family, and baby.

Then, one day you realize something; mom physically have to give birth.

While you intellectually understand the concept of childbirth, thinking about being in labor probably isn’t something you’ve dreamed about or discussed in great detail with others.

Unlike putting together the crib, labor doesn’t come with a set of directions.  Every well-meaning person you talk to will have a completely different take on birth that will either encourage you or make you want to run and hide.

However, just like you’ve prepared and worked hard to create a welcoming, safe home for your baby, you also need to spend some time preparing your mind, body, and soul for childbirth.

Being prepared both physically and mentally will help the mother stay in control of the situation during delivery. It is important that the mother feels in control, and that the baby’s birth is as positive an experience as possible. In order to be able to function as effectively as possible during labour and delivery, both parents must be familiar with the three stages of labour, the standard labour and delivery procedures involved, and the recommended breathing and relaxation techniques and pain control options.

Labour, as the name implies, is hard work and requires a great deal of mental and physical energy. Being able to relax between and during contractions conserves the mother’s strength. Preparing for birth in advance usually eases the delivery process. It is not always possible for the father to attend the birth and, when this is possible, it is ultimately the father’s own choice. Alternatively, the mother can also have some other person as a companion, a close friend, a relative or a doula (a person trained in labour support), for example. Whatever the decision, it should be made as early as possible.

Key issues / Problems

pregnancy that has progressed without any apparent hitch can still give way to complications during delivery. Here are some of the most common concerns.

Failure to Progress (Prolonged Labor)

A small percentage of women, mostly first-time mothers, may experience a labor that lasts too long. In this situation, both the mother and the baby are at risk for several complications including infections.

Abnormal Presentation

Presentation refers to the position the fetus takes as your body prepares for delivery, and it could be either vertex (head down) or breech (buttocks down). In the weeks before your due date, the fetus usually drops lower in the uterus. Ideally for labor, the baby is positioned head-down, facing the mother’s back, with its chin tucked to its chest and the back of the head ready to enter the pelvis. That way, the smallest possible part of the baby’s head leads the way through the cervix and into the birth canal.

Because the head is the largest and least flexible part of the baby, it’s best for it to lead the way into the birth canal. That way there’s little risk the body will make it through but the baby’s head will get hung up. In cephalopelvic disproportion, the baby’s head is often too large to fit through the mother’s pelvis, either because of their relative sizes or because of poor positioning of the fetus.

Umbilical Cord Prolapse

The umbilical cord is your baby’s lifeline. Oxygen and other nutrients are passed from your system to your baby, through the placenta and the umbilical cord. Sometimes before or during labor, the umbilical cord can slip through the cervix, preceding the baby into the birth canal. It may even protrude from the vagina. This is dangerous because the umbilical cord can get blocked and stop blood flow through the cord. You will probably feel the cord in the birth canal and may see it if it protrudes from your vagina. This is an emergency situation. Call an ambulance to get you to the hospital.

Umbilical Cord Compression

Because the fetus moves a lot inside the uterus, the umbilical cord can get wrapped and unwrapped around the baby many times throughout the pregnancy. While there are “cord accidents” in which the cord gets twisted around and harms the baby, this is extremely rare and usually can’t be prevented.

Sometimes the umbilical cord gets stretched and compressed during labor, leading to a brief decrease in the flow of blood within it. This can cause sudden, short drops in the fetal heart rate, called variable decelerations, which are usually picked up by monitors during labor. Cord compression happens in about one in 10 deliveries. In most cases, these changes are of no major concern and most babies quickly pass through this stage and the birth proceeds normally. But a cesarean section may be necessary if the heart rate worsens or the fetus shows other signs of distress, such as decrease of fetal blood pH or passing of the baby’s first stool (meconium).

Causes and Treatments Failure to Progress (Prolonged Labor)

Failure to progress refers to labor that does not move as fast as it should. This could happen with a big baby, a baby that does not present normally or with a uterus that does not contract appropriately. But more often than not, no specific cause for “failure to progress” is found. If labor goes on too long, your doctor may give you intravenous fluids to help prevent you from getting dehydrated. If the uterus does not contract enough, he or she may give you oxytocin, a medicine that promotes stronger contractions. And if the cervix stops dilating despite strong contractions of the uterus, a cesarean section may be indicated.

Abnormal Presentation

Sometimes a placenta previa may cause an abnormal presentation. But many times the cause is not known. Towards the end of your third trimester, your doctor will check the presentation and position of your fetus by feeling your abdomen. If the fetus remains in breech presentation several weeks before the due date, your doctor may attempt to turn the baby into the correct position.

One option typically offered to women after 36 weeks is an “external cephalic version,” which involves manually rotating the baby in cog-like fashion inside the uterus. These manipulations work about 50% to 60% of the time. They’re usually more successful on women who have given birth previously because their uteruses stretch more easily.

“Versions” typically take place in the hospital, just in case an emergency cesarean delivery becomes necessary. To make the procedure easier to perform, safer for the baby and more tolerable for the mother-to-be, doctors sometimes administer a uterine muscle relaxant, then use an ultrasound machine and electronic fetal monitor as guides. The procedure typically doesn’t involve anesthesia, but sometimes an epidural can help with the version. Since not all doctors have been trained to do versions, you may be referred to another obstetrician in your area.

There is a very small risk that the maneuver could cause the baby’s cord to become entangled or the placenta to separate from the uterus. There’s also a chance that the baby might flip back into a breech position before delivery, so some doctors induce labor immediately. The risk of reverting to breech is lower closer to term, but the bigger the baby, the harder it is to turn.

The procedure can be uncomfortable, but avoids a cesarean section, which is most likely if the baby can’t be moved into the proper position.

Umbilical Cord

Umbilical cord prolapse happens more often when a fetus is small, preterm, in breech (frank, complete or incomplete/footling) presentation, or if its head hasn’t entered the mother’s pelvis yet (“floating presenting part”). This prolapse can occur, too, if the amniotic sac breaks before the fetus has moved into place in the pelvis.

Umbilical cord prolapse is an emergency. If you are not at the hospital when it happens, call an ambulance to take you there. Until help arrives, get on your hands and knees with your chest on the floor and your buttocks raised. In this position, gravity will help keep the baby from pressing against the cord and cutting off his or her blood and oxygen supply. Once you get to the hospital, a cesarean delivery will probably be performed unless a vaginal birth is already progressing naturally.

Umbilical Cord Compression

Umbilical cord compression can occur if the cord becomes wrapped around the baby’s neck or if it is positioned between the baby’s head and the mother’s pelvic bone. You may be given oxygen to increase the amount available to your baby. Your doctor may hurry along the delivery by using forceps or vacuum assistance, or in some cases, delivering the baby by cesarean section.